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The previous 27 versions of Unbounded hope have been using the first-person plural “we” as the default point of view as is shown just below. Below that #27 will be version #28 using first-person singular “I” as the point of view.


This version, #27, is revealed to me at this time as …

We seek unbounded hope for our future by doing another unique kind act, and by:

1. —exploring the orderly nature of our bountiful Universe, so we can help ourselves and others benefit from everything that it makes possible.

2. —striving to physically survive as individuals and as a species by seeking opportunities to live and participate in every favorable place.

3. —creating open-ended attractor goals, so you and I and all living beings can have meaningful lives within our personal worlds.

4. —becoming known to everyone as dedicating our wisdom and energy to alleviating the suffering of all beings.

5. —helping everyone to find meaning in their lives by helping them to find a personal path to kind acts and thus to unbounded hope.

6. —making a habit of giving our attention to individuals and acknowledging their wisdom and kind acts within our shared Universe.

7. —appreciating that we as people expressing diverse views to one another are more likely to discover the bounty of our Universe and the beautiful new ways we may choose to live our lives.


Below is the “I” version of Unbounded hope:


This version, #28, is revealed to me at this time as …

I seek unbounded hope for my future by doing another unique kind act for myself, and by:

1. —exploring the orderly nature of my bountiful Universe, so I can help myself to benefit from everything that it makes possible.

2. —striving to physically survive as an individual by seeking opportunities to exploit every favorable place and thing.

3. —creating open-ended attractor goals, so I can have a meaningful life within my own personal world.

4. —becoming known to everyone as dedicating my wisdom and energy to alleviating my suffering by indulging in my pleasures.

5. —helping me to find meaning in my life by helping the various aspects of my personality to find a path to unbounded pleasure.

6. —making a habit of giving my attention to my various selves and acknowledging their wisdom within my inner Universe.

7. —appreciating that I as a complex personality expressing diverse views to myself is more likely to discover the bounty of my Universe and the pleasurable new ways I may choose to live my life.


As this self-centered “I” version was being written out, it became clear that this new version #28 was similar to Classical Epicurean philosophy, which is finding happiness by exploiting short term pleasures. Epicurus himself proposed a much milder version of hedonism which is loosely freedom from fear and limiting one’s desires to easily attainable mild real-world opportunities. Modern hedonists aim to absolutely maximize pleasure by any means possible and are known as sybarites. Unfortunately, for these people, their extreme behaviors often end in disaster.

Version #27 is closer to the Stoic philosophical world view.