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..BMI … 23.41 … 25
Height
4’6″  …  97.1 … 103.7
4’7″  … 100.7 … 107.6
4’8″  … 104.4 … 111.5
4’9″  … 108.2 … 115.6
4’10” … 112.0 … 119.7
4’11” … 115.8 … 123.8
5’0″  … 119.9 … 128.0
5’1″  … 123.9 … 132.3
5’2″  … 128.0 … 136.7
5’3″  … 132.2 … 141.2
5’4″  … 136.4 … 145.6
5’5″  … 140.7 … 150.3
5’6″  … 145.1 … 155.0
5’7″  … 149.5 … 159.7
5’8″  … 154.0 … 165.0
5’9″  … 158.5 … 169.5
5’10” … 163.2 … 174.3
5’11” … 167.9 … 179.3
6’0″  … 172.6 … 184.4
6’1″  … 177.5 … 189.5
6’2″  … 182.3 … 194.8
6’3″  … 187.3 … 200.0
6’4″  … 192.4 … 205.4
6’5″  … 197.4 … 210.9
6’6″  … 202.6 … 216.4

The BMI (Body Mass Index) isn’t a very good measure of life expectancy but it is the only scientifically tracked method at present. Even with that data available, there isn’t much agreement on what an ideal BMI should be. The official literature says that we as individuals should strive to be below BMI 25 but just how much below isn’t clearly defined. Another obvious question is at what age is the supposed below 25 recommendation applicable? Is life expectancy of a twenty-five-year-old best at BMI 30 or is that a good BMI for an eighty-year-old?
What about height and BMI relationship to life expectancy at various ages? Furthermore, does the data derived from white males near the average height of five foot nine inches have any validity for those at five feet three inches or six feet three inches? Probably those BMI figures are meaningless for seeking an ideal BMI at those modest differences of height, gender, race, and national location.
I hesitate to say my taking the time to calculate the height to weight BMI, seen above, to a high precision was meaningless, but I was seeking an ideal body weight for myself.
What is the ideal BMI/body weight for an eighty-two-year-old white American male who once was five foot nine but is now five foot eight? Do I use my youthful height or my geriatric height for the calculation? When a male is young there are far greater threats to his existence than a point or two on his BMI but at age eighty-two I presently have excellent blood pressure, and so with good basic life expectancy, it makes sense to adjust my weight to the ideal.
My weight this morning was 166.6 which is slightly above the CDC recommendation of below BMI 25 because by my calculation above I must be below 165.0. I have been doing the daily intermittent-fasting technique for seven months and have consistently lost two pounds per month. At that rate, I can go on down to 154.0 in six months. But, should I? That weight is based on the BMI of 23.41 which was the statistically derived bottom of a life expectancy curve. The curve is almost flat for several pounds at that BMI level but how was that data created?
Getting the BMI on a large number of eighty-two-year-olds and following them until their deaths would give a reasonable estimate. That information is probably derivable from existing data banks because the Veterans Administration has been routinely taking height and weight on their patients for years. They would have accurate BMI data and death statistics.
There must be a personal ideal weight for every individual.

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